Rose City Blues

Classes

 
 

Rose City Blues INSTRUCTORS

Meet your 2018 Rose City Blues instructor team!

 
 
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Brenda Russell

Brenda is fulfilling her childhood dream as a professional dancer and instructor. She studies African American street dances from the turn of the century to the present. Brenda travels around the world teaching and training with various coaches and historians. Her strength is breaking down the dances in a way that is accessible for anyone, even if they don’t have a dance background. She strives to help her students find the dancer with-in themselves, taking inspiration from dancers of the past. Brenda is working with the Blues dance community during this time of growth to develop curriculum and events that raise the community’s level of dancing. Her hope is to provide structure for duplicable material, while keeping the inherent character and nature of the dance.

Saturday Dec 8th

11:00-12:00pm - Exercises for Efficient Learning (Large Movements/Bigger Space)

Come prepare your body and mind for learning.  Easy fun warm-ups for improving brain synapses and mobility.

3:00-4:15pm - Giving It To You Straight (75 min) feat. Dan Nash (Close Embrace/Small Space)

Early American Blues was commonly done in a binary or straight Blues style. When the music is subdivided by two the transitions of axis change and expressions of rhythm are small and efficient. Learn the fundamentals and tricks of dancing to Binary Blues from the Delta to Sweet Home Chicago.

4:30-5:45pm - That's Swingin' (75 min) feat. Dan Nash (Med/Small Space, partnered)

Swung beats refers to a subdivision of three, or a triplet rhythm, as opposed to the Binary rhythms explored earlier. So now we have Ternary rhythms adding a wave to our Blues. We will explore 7 types of spinal movements that can be used to express Ternary Blues music.

Sunday Dec. 9th

1:45-2:45pm  Blues Grooves with Brenda Russell feat. Carlton Jackson and Alan Hager

Brenda will share the common Blues Grooves heard in local bars throughout the West and ideas for matching up dance steps with Blues rhythms.

3:00-4:15pm  Jook! (75 min) (Small to Med Space, mostly in embrace)

Coming back into the stationary dances of Binary and Ternary Blues to get you movin' and groovin', adding syncopations that will take you to that special place of continuous and effortless mechanics for efficiency, as well as partner dynamics for maneuvering in tight spaces.

4:30-5:45pm  Love that Afro Beat (75 min) (Med Space, small amount of traveling)

Find out what St. Louis Blues, Hound Dog, and Baby Scratch My Back have in common, and how to move into a four beat basic structure of Two-Step dancing. Brenda will cover a simple survival kit for Afro Latin Blues, and how to sink deep into the groove, as opposed to floating on top of the metronome. We will also explore the body movements derived from African, Afro-Caribbean, and Afro-Latin dance.


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catherine palmier

Catherine was born and raised in Paris. Her first taste and experience with dance was in her household where she saw her parents from Guadeloupe, West Indies, dance Zouk, Compas, Biguine, and Gwo Ka.  She also had the chance to live in Guadeloupe for a year, in which she deeply experienced and understood the partner dances of the Caribbean. After a year in Guadeloupe, Catherine developed a keen and curious eye for movements.  While in nursing school, she studied West African dance in Paris.

She studied under Norma Claire, whom Catherine calls her mentor, and whose pedagogy enabled her to explore every part of her body in order to combine physical sensations and observations.  With this powerful tool, Catherine continued her training in African dance with Elsa Wolliaston, Hawa Kouyaté, Koffi Koko, Moustapha Bangouroura, Mouminatou Camara, and traveled to Burkina Faso, Senegal, and Guinée to polish her art.  Catherine also spent five years at a professional dance school in Paris where she studied Modern, Jazz, contemporary, and anatomy.

Saturday Dec 8th

3:00-4:15pm Pulse and Groove:

Let's keep our Blues alive by pulsing and grooving. Pulse is one of the most important component of Blues, so let's play, work, reinforce, or enhance it.

intermediate. Size of the room does not matter.

4:30-5:45pm - From Roots to Blues:

A class in which participants will be able to explore the African aesthetic of Blues by using everyday "African postures" that is noticeable in art and motion throughout the African continent.

All level. Size of the room does not matter.

Sunday Dec. 9th

3:00-4:15pm - Quality Matters:

This class will give you an opportunity to further work on your solo and quality of movement and vocabulary while exploring blues styles such as shuffle and latin blues, etc. This class is for experienced dancers as we will work on solo and improvisation in addition of Quality of movements.

4:30-5:45pm - Expand your Roots:

This class focuses on West African movements. Participants will learn movements from traditional dances from Guinea and Senegal. This class will allow participants to feel and integrate the groove of the traditional steps.

intermediate and advance




 
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Damon Stone

Damon has been dancing his entire life, starting with vernacular Jazz/Blues first taught to him at the tender age of six by his grandmother. After nearly a decade of learning at the heels of his elders, he went on and eventually studied a numerous dance forms until coming full circle in 1995 to focus primarily on the history and styles of Swing and Blues as his family danced them with a special focus on the Southern styles from the Mississippi Delta region. He has studied the development of vernacular Jazz/Blues dance across the United States learning from a number of the original dancers. He is largely regarded as one of the foremost authorities on Blues idiom dance and has been interviewed as a dance historian in documentary and for radio. Damon has been a featured instructor at camps, festivals, and workshops across five continents.

Visit http://damonstone.dance for more info.

Friday Dec 7th

7:30pm-8:45pm - Fundamentals In-Depth (All Levels)

Saturday Dec 8th

11:00am-12:00pm - The Porch

No, this class is not about adding the Hustle into your dance but how to use tempo changes in your dancing as means of musical expression. Shifting it into high gear to create intensity or dropping the speed to create tension in your dancing while complimenting or contrasting rhythmic and lyrical music. We'll develop this skill by focusing on two specific aesthetic elements: lag and ephebism.

3:00-4:15pm Funkdafied - A fun-filled class on Funky Butt to Funky Blues. 'nuff said.

4:30-5:45pm Like Lightning - This class will be an exploration of Lightning Hopkins' music and the various ways of dancing to it mixing both blues idiom dancing and freestyle blues.

Sunday Dec. 9th

3:00-4:15pm  Next Level Texas Shuffle - This class will help you increase your comfortableness with the signature footwork of Texas Shuffle, how to better utilize groove space, and how to incorporate and use the body groove to better lead and follow.

4:30-5:45pm  Style AND Substance - How to add dynamic movement to create your own personal style without sacrificing the blues aesthetic or abandoning your role.


 Photo From KMHD.com

Photo From KMHD.com

Carlton Jackson - Lecturer, Drummer

Los Angeles Times longtime Jazz music critic Don Heckman once wrote of Carlton Jackson’s drumming as being “intensely musical”.

A native of Portland, Oregon, Carlton has been associated with many areas of the musical world, both performance and recording. His well-documented work with contemporary Jazz pianists Tom Grant, David Ornette Cherry, Gordon Lee, Darrell Grant, and Dan Siegel, guitarists Dan Dalmer and Terry Robb, Rhythm & Blues singers Curtis Salgado and Lloyd Jones, Country Folk singer Toni Land, violinist Darol Anger, recordings with Oregon Catholic Press and Composer Jon Newton have solidified his status as an engaging and versatile performer.

Carlton is currently a long-time member of the teaching faculty of the Mel Brown/Western Oregon University Jazz Workshop and teaches drum set privately at Rhythm Traders in NE Portland. He continues to be involved with many facets of music education at the grade school, high school, and college levels. The Oregon Coast Jazz Party, Clark College Jazz Festival, University of Portland, Portland State University, Willamette University, Battleground High School, and others have used Carlton’s expertise in the local classroom/festival atmosphere.

He also co-leads the Carlton Jackson-Dave Mills Big Band, an 18 member professional big band, with trumpet player/composer Dave Mills in the Portland area. The band has performed at many prestigious events including the Safeway Waterfront Blues Festival, The Mt. Hood Festival of Jazz, The Washington Park Summer Festival, and the Portland Rose Festival, plus concerts with the Oregon Symphony under the batons of James DePreist, Murry Sidlin and Normal Leyden have been some of the atmosphere of the band’s output. In addition, the group and it’s co-leaders were featured in a program called “Oregon Art Beat” by Oregon Public Broadcasting (PBS).

Carlton is a multiple winner of the Cascade Blues Association “Muddy Award”, the Portland Music Association’s Crystal Award in 1992, and is also a 2008 inductee of the Oregon Music Hall of Fame.

Aquarian Drumheads, Portland Drum Company, Sound Foundry Cymbals and Drum Workshop Drums (since 1992) are still Carlton’s choice of great products to play his music with.

http://drummer-at-large.blogspot.com/

Sunday Dec. 9th

12:30pm-1:30pm - A World of Grooves (Lecture)

(w/ music demonstrations)
Carlton will explore the DNA that hooks many popular grooves together and we'll talk about their appeal to the general population.


 Photo by Hunter Paye Photography

Photo by Hunter Paye Photography

Reggie Houston - Lecturer, Saxophonist

A seventh-generation New Orleanian, Reggie Houston was born on July 2, 1947, to Ralph Houston, a pianist and acoustic bassist, and Margarete Houston, an educator and social activist. Reggie embraced education and followed in his parents footsteps to become an arts education advocate, teacher, and world-renowned saxophonist.

Reggie was inspired to study saxophone at age 10, after seeing Ray Charles play alto sax at Lincoln Beach Amusement Park, where Fats Domino also performed during Reggie's childhood. Years later, Reggie would share the stage with both musical giants, and spend 22 years as a member of Fats Domino's band, before moving to Portland, Oregon in 2004.

Reggie’s devotion to his craft, and to sharing his deep knowledge of Louisiana’s history, musicians, and musical genres, stems from a time-honored New Orleans tradition of arts education. Nurtured by his teachers—musical giants like Edward “Kidd” Jordan, Johnny Fernandez, Danny Barker, and Alvin Batiste—the latter of whom learned at the knee of legendary musician Sidney Bechet, referred to by Duke Ellington as “the very epitome of jazz,” Reggie has now picked up the mantle to pass that knowledge on to future generations of musicians.

When funk first developed, exploding onto the scene, Reggie was there—not as an observer, but as a 13 year-old musician playing his first professional gigs with legendary keyboardist David Batiste Sr. and The Gladiators, widely accepted as one of the preeminent and pioneering bands of funk.

Reggie knows the music. It is in his blood. He can trace the many, varied styles and influences of southeast Louisiana music all the way back to pre-colonial Africa. It is this knowledge, coupled with the strong arts education tradition of his hometown that gave rise to Reggie’s newest project, Anonymous Legends: A History of New Orleans Music—the culmination of Reggie’s life’s work.

https://reggiehouston.com/

Saturday December 8th

1:40-2:45pm - Historical Connections - the Evolution of Jazz-Dance (Lecture)



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Kelsy Stone

Kelsy brings her lifetime of dance training, a passion for vernacular dance, and a sharp eye for technique to the Blues dance world. She has brought her joy and knowledge of blues idiom dances to some of the most high-profile events in the US, including but not limited to: bluesSHOUT!, The Experiment, and Nocturne Blues--serving as faculty, mentor, competition coordinator, and judge.

Kelsy's critical eye and love of deep technique are tempered by her love of "dad jokes," getting lost in the music, and embracing of the ridiculous. She shows her appreciation of African American culture by speaking of the history of Blues idiom dance and taking her craft seriously, but never herself. She believes every mistake is an opportunity to learn, every class an opportunity to challenge, and every dance an opportunity to pay respect to those who came before.

Friday Dec 7th

7:30pm-8:45pm - Fundamentals In-Depth (All Levels)

Saturday Dec 8th

11:00am-12:00pm - The Porch

No, this class is not about adding the Hustle into your dance but how to use tempo changes in your dancing as means of musical expression. Shifting it into high gear to create intensity or dropping the speed to create tension in your dancing while complimenting or contrasting rhythmic and lyrical music. We'll develop this skill by focusing on two specific aesthetic elements: lag and ephebism.

3:00-4:15pm Funkdafied - A fun-filled class on Funky Butt to Funky Blues. 'nuff said.

4:30-5:45pm Like Lightning - This class will be an exploration of Lightning Hopkins' music and the various ways of dancing to it mixing both blues idiom dancing and freestyle blues.

Sunday Dec. 9th

3:00-4:15pm  Next Level Texas Shuffle - This class will help you increase your comfortableness with the signature footwork of Texas Shuffle, how to better utilize groove space, and how to incorporate and use the body groove to better lead and follow.

4:30-5:45pm  Style AND Substance - How to add dynamic movement to create your own personal style without sacrificing the blues aesthetic or abandoning your role.

 Photo from benjonesbass.com

Photo from benjonesbass.com

Ben Jones - Lecturer, Bassist

The young Drummer Ben Jones at 14 years old sat studying Ray Gomez’ guitar work on a Stanley Clarke album with the goal of learning how all the players “fit” together. Instead, he became entranced by Stanley's bass playing. Ben was a Bassman from that point forward.

On record, Ben's tasteful bass work can be heard on Chance Hayden's "The Family Tree" (2012), Lloyd Jones' "Doin What It Takes" (2012/Fresh) as well as his "Love Gotcha" release (1999/Blind Pig), the Neville Brothers' 2008 CD entitled 'The Heart and Soul of New Orleans' (available for download on iTunes), Reggie Houston's latest release, 2010's 'Homage 1', Soul vocalist Liv Warfield's CD "Embrace Me" (2006/B&M Records), Linda Hornbuckle with No DeLay's 'Soul Diva meets the Blues Monsters'(1996/Criminal Records), guitarist/vocalist/songwriter Robert 'Rude' Brown's 'Arcade' (1998), and vocalist Calvin Walker's 'Ending the Beginning' (1998) as well as upcoming releases from gospel vocalist Mary Morton, a live CD/DVD.

Now a Bassist/Musical Director of 35+ years, you can hear him playing most Thursday nights at the Blue Diamond in Portland, OR with the Just Friends Band. Regardless of what this bassist, vocalist, composer is doing, his drive, professionalism, dedication, and enthusiasm for everything he does definitely makes Ben Jones a force to be reckoned with...and one NOT to be missed!

http://www.benjonesbass.com

Saturday December 8th

12:30-1:30pm - In my life as a Blues Artist (Lecture)

Ben shares his personal experiences as a musician, as a member of the Blues scene, his cultural perspectives.  Find out how you can become part of, get involved with, support, and add value to the Blues Scene.